Date   

Re: #streetchildren #streetchildren

 

Hi Mustafa, 
Great that it will hopefully be useful...  do let us know if you identify any successful approaches that you find for working with street children during the outbreak... it is always helpful to share with others what works and doesn't in this unique context!
Good luck
Alyson   


Re: #streetchildren #streetchildren

Mustafa Hassan
 

Dear Alyson,

 

Thank you so much for sharing, this is very interesting and thanks for highlighting the work of “Street Invest” which is very informative. I understand that colleagues from several countries (for example, Egypt, Sudan, India, Bangladesh) have rich experience on working with children working and/or living in the streets and it would be interesting to see how this is being adapted to COVID-19 compared to the highlighted work of Street Work in Ghana, Kenya, Sierra Leone and South.

 

Best regards

Mustafa

 

From: Forum@CPCOVID19.groups.io <Forum@CPCOVID19.groups.io> On Behalf Of Alyson Eynon via groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, May 6, 2020 12:49 PM
To: Forum@CPCOVID19.groups.io
Cc: Oñate, Silvia <Silvia.Onate@...>; Simon Hills <hills@...>
Subject: [cpaorcovid19] #streetchildren

 

Hello

 

I’ve got no idea if this will work, it’s the first time I’ve  use it… in response to post from mushassan@... “Several colleagues mentioned challenges facing the response to protection needs of children working and/or living in the streets during the COVID-19 pandemic. Main challenges are related to disruption of regular activities by the social protection system, access due to the lockdown, risk of starvation with the closure of markets, high risk of spread of COVID-19 among children without being registered or recognized, etc. Any other challenges? any ideas to share to adapt regular response to the COVID-19 situation and ensure safety of both children and child protection actors?”

 

In response to this message:

So in response, I’m not sure of the context/country... so difficult to be precise… but within local infection control and lockdown rules… some thoughts would be:

  • Increasing alternative/interim/emergency care options to get children off the streets where they can isolate, receiving housing, food, medical care.  
  • Working with the government on improved care options but also securing allowances to provide essential services based including moving on the streets and conduct welfare checks/drop food packages/provide water and education on hand washing etc.
  • Where restrictions allow some work, working in smaller groups with social distancing etc.
  • Have you seen this website… Street Work: Making the Streets Safer during Covid-19? (https://www.streetinvest.org/blog/street-work-making-street-safer-during-covid-19) to summarise it, it recommends:
    • Safe spaces for street children: Advocating for governments to take steps to provide alternative accommodation for children who live on the street full time. Street children needs safe places where they can self-isolate safely in a way that respects their rights and meets their basic needs.
    • Staying on the streets: engaging government: Using experiences to inform community leaders, government etc. on how children on the street are being impacted by coronavirus.
    • Providing essential food and installing water supplies: Using existing teams to provide health education, food delivery/service, medicine distribution, water provisions, hand washing information. The consistent presence of adults who children know and trust is proving instrumental not just to their safety, but their survival.
    • Street champions – staff and others
    • There is guidance note specifically for street workers: (https://www.streetinvest.org/resources/coronavirus-covid-19-guidance). Also attached to this email.
  • Also take a  look at the AOR drop box alternative care resources – there some good ones there too on virtual monitoring; guidance on different alternative care options (Iraq);  guidance on COVID-19 in interim care centre. There’s quite a bit there that should be useful!
  • Essentially agreement needs to be sought with the government/local community to reach this group of highly vulnerable children… working with other organisations/sub-cluster groups will help, but targeted interventions will be needed to provide essential services such as food and water for hand washing, and ideally emergency care provided in line with best interests etc.

 

I hope this helps, feel free to remain in touch.  

 

Best wishes, Alyson Eynon (Child Labour Task Force)  

 

 

Alyson Eynon – Humanitarian Child Protection Advisor – alysoneynon@... – Skype: alyson.eynon

 


#streetchildren #streetchildren

 

Hello

 

I’ve got no idea if this will work, it’s the first time I’ve  use it… in response to post from mushassan@... “Several colleagues mentioned challenges facing the response to protection needs of children working and/or living in the streets during the COVID-19 pandemic. Main challenges are related to disruption of regular activities by the social protection system, access due to the lockdown, risk of starvation with the closure of markets, high risk of spread of COVID-19 among children without being registered or recognized, etc. Any other challenges? any ideas to share to adapt regular response to the COVID-19 situation and ensure safety of both children and child protection actors?”

 

In response to this message:

So in response, I’m not sure of the context/country... so difficult to be precise… but within local infection control and lockdown rules… some thoughts would be:

  • Increasing alternative/interim/emergency care options to get children off the streets where they can isolate, receiving housing, food, medical care.  
  • Working with the government on improved care options but also securing allowances to provide essential services based including moving on the streets and conduct welfare checks/drop food packages/provide water and education on hand washing etc.
  • Where restrictions allow some work, working in smaller groups with social distancing etc.
  • Have you seen this website… Street Work: Making the Streets Safer during Covid-19? (https://www.streetinvest.org/blog/street-work-making-street-safer-during-covid-19) to summarise it, it recommends:
    • Safe spaces for street children: Advocating for governments to take steps to provide alternative accommodation for children who live on the street full time. Street children needs safe places where they can self-isolate safely in a way that respects their rights and meets their basic needs.
    • Staying on the streets: engaging government: Using experiences to inform community leaders, government etc. on how children on the street are being impacted by coronavirus.
    • Providing essential food and installing water supplies: Using existing teams to provide health education, food delivery/service, medicine distribution, water provisions, hand washing information. The consistent presence of adults who children know and trust is proving instrumental not just to their safety, but their survival.
    • Street champions – staff and others
    • There is guidance note specifically for street workers: (https://www.streetinvest.org/resources/coronavirus-covid-19-guidance). Also attached to this email.
  • Also take a  look at the AOR drop box alternative care resources – there some good ones there too on virtual monitoring; guidance on different alternative care options (Iraq);  guidance on COVID-19 in interim care centre. There’s quite a bit there that should be useful!
  • Essentially agreement needs to be sought with the government/local community to reach this group of highly vulnerable children… working with other organisations/sub-cluster groups will help, but targeted interventions will be needed to provide essential services such as food and water for hand washing, and ideally emergency care provided in line with best interests etc.

 

I hope this helps, feel free to remain in touch.  

 

Best wishes, Alyson Eynon (Child Labour Task Force)  

 

 

Alyson Eynon – Humanitarian Child Protection Advisor – alysoneynon@... – Skype: alyson.eynon

 


#Webinar #TechnicalNote #VAC #EndViolenceAtHome #technicalnote #vac #endviolenceathome #Webinar

Lauren Bienkowski
 

Hi All, 

Updating you on a new technical note from the Alliance and upcoming webinar:

New Technical Note on 
COVID-19: Protecting Children from Violence, Abuse, and Neglect in the HomeThis resource, which is informed by reports from the field, examines issues that children may face as countries implement lockdowns and stay-at-home orders to curb the spread of COVID-19. Protective prevention and response strategies are then outlined with the goal of strengthening the protection of children in all types of homes. 
 
Webinar on the new "End Violence At Home Technical Note" on 
May 8 @ 3:00pm CESTThis webinar examines the above-mentioned technical note on protecting children from violence, abuse, and neglect 
in the home as countries implement lockdowns and stay-at-home orders to curb the spread of COVID-19. 

Warm regards,
Lauren

CP AoR Global Help Desk


Challenges to provide child protection services for children living and/or working in the streets #streetchildren

Mustafa Hassan
 

Several colleagues mentioned challenges facing the response to protection needs of children working and/or living in the streets during the COVID-19 pandemic. Main challenges are related to disruption of regular activities by the social protection system, access due to the lockdown, risk of starvation with the closure of markets, high risk of spread of COVID-19 among children without being registered or recognized, etc. Any other challenges? any ideas to share to adapt regular response to the COVID-19 situation and ensure safety of both children and child protection actors?


#Prevention #Isolation #QuarantineFacilities #Webinar on 1st May: Approaches to isolation, quarantine and prevention measures in a Humanitarian Setting #isolation #QuarantineFacilities #Webinar #prevention

Lauren Bienkowski
 

 

Event: Webinar

Approaches to isolation, quarantine and prevention measures such as shielding of vulnerable individuals in a Humanitarian Setting

Practices and considerations in a COVID-19 context

 

 

 

The Global Health, Shelter, Protection, Camp Management and Camp Coordination Clusters are inviting you to a webinar (via WebEx) on Approaches to isolation, quarantine and prevention measures such as shielding of vulnerable individuals in a Humanitarian Setting: Practices and considerations in a COVID-19 context 

Basic info
Time and date: Friday, 01 May 2020
, 15:30 – 17:00 (Geneva)
Length: 90 minutes 

Purpose

 

As COVID-19 spreads, the humanitarian sector is quickly adapting to new challenges while continuing to provide assistance in ongoing emergencies and disasters.  The need to protect vulnerable communities and persons from the fall out of COVID-19 is real and urgent.

The webinar intends to discuss practices being piloted or considered in the field, including quarantine, isolation, shielding or creation of a ‘green zone’ in a camp or a camp-like setting and challenges faced by humanitarian actors and displaced communities in effectively implementing such measures.

Target audience: All humanitarian practitioners working in camps and camp -like settings, in particular in the areas of protection, health, shelter, camp coordination and camp management.

Agenda

 
15:30-15:35 Welcome and introduction of the webinar,  William Chemaly, Global Protection Cluster Coordinator

 

15:35-15:40 Ensure a common approach, interlinkages and basic understanding by humanitarian actors of the topic. What is the difference between isolation and quarantine, and what do we intend to achieve with shielding measures,  Daniela Raiman, Global CCCM Cluster Coordinator

 
15:40 -15:50  Highlight protection issues and concerns particular to quarantine and isolation centers and alternatives used to shield vulnerable individuals in camps and camp-like settings as well as specific concerns  faced by humanitarian actors in implementing programs and delivering services that are in line with human rights standards and a human rights based approach,
William Chemaly, Global Protection Cluster Coordinator
 
15:50 – 16:00 What are the public health principles of isolation and quarantine, and how can these be implemented in camps and camp-like settings? How can measures aimed at shielding biomedically vulnerable individuals from COVID-19 be implemented?,
Teresa Zakaria, Health Emergency Officer, WHO
 
16:00- 16:10 Shelter current practices and experience: what are the measures to be taken for adjustments to shelter and settlement planning to help reduce density and mitigate COVID 19 transmission risk?,
Bret Moore, Global Shelter Cluster Coordinator
 
16:10 – 16:20 Camps and camp-like settings: What are the measures to be taken when setting up and managing quarantine or isolation centers in camps and camp-like settings? What are the other alternative approaches implemented by field operations when quarantine or isolation centers are not feasible?,
Daniela Raiman, Global CCCM Cluster Coordinator
 
16:20 – 17:00 Discussion and concluding observations
Dial-in instructions

Meeting link: https://unhcr.webex.com/unhcr/j.php?MTID=m8fff9d89bc5f7d19269ae246158a2517

Meeting number: 702 487 644

Password: phFicTbU675

More ways to join

Join by video system

Dial 702487644@...

You can also dial 62.109.219.4 and enter your meeting number.

Join by phone

+44-203-478-5289 United Kingdom toll

Access code: 702 487 644

Global call-in numbers

 Speakers 

Teresa Zakaria: Health Emergency Officer, WHO
Daniela Raiman: Global CCCM Cluster Coordinator
Brett Moore: Global Shelter Cluster Coordinator
William Chemaly: Global Protection Cluster Coordinator


 
 


Re: discoordination challenges in the response #coordination

Petra Heusser - CP AoR
 

Hi Chris,

Yes, absolutely agreed on not reinventing the wheel!
The activation of coordination platforms should always aim to reinforce national mechanisms and established coordination groups, avoid duplication and creation of parallel systems!
From the CP AoR we've worked on a few Key Aspects on the Activation of Child Protection Coordination Platforms for Responding to COVID-19 to guide this - have a look at the attachment or here.

As for country examples, I hope we can hear from colleagues based in operations - over to them!


Re: discoordination challenges in the response #coordination

Chris Cooper - ChildFund
 

Eric, is it possible to provide some examples of these new platforms for COVID-19 response coordination? The CAT-Team has discussed the strategy of promoting the centrality of CP in the multilateral COVID-19 response frameworks, so that regional and country-level CP advocacy becomes more about the need to follow the multilateral response frameworks, with messaging about why it is not necessary to reinvent the wheel. A quicker, more effective response can be coordinated by adhering to the multilateral frameworks (which, if we have done our work, emphasize cross-sectoral CP.


discoordination challenges in the response #coordination

Eric Wyss
 

We've been contacted with questions about challenges in coordinating the response during COVID, as newly established platforms are not building on existing coordination mechanisms. Also, these new platforms are heavily focusing on health aspects of the emergency and child protection actors are struggling to get their voice heard. Any ideas or examples to address this? 


#DutyofCare #StaffHealthSafetyandWellbeing #DutyofCare #StaffHealthSafetyandWellbeing

Lauren Bienkowski
 

New Technical Note: Social Service Workforce Safety and Wellbeing during the COVID-19 Response - Recommended Actions

A well-supported social service workforce, appropriately equipped and protected, is essential to mitigating the damaging effects of COVID-19. As the COVID-19 pandemic escalates, so do the vulnerabilities of the individuals and communities that the social service workforce serves. Social service workers can build on existing strong ties to communities and rapidly respond, but to do so, they must also stay safe and healthy.

In some cases, face-to-face contact can be replaced by remote support using various forms of technology. In other cases, there is a clear need for in-person contact when not intervening poses a greater risk to children or families.

A new technical note has been developed to provide guidance for rapidly supporting the work of the social service workforce to enable them to safely serve children, families and communities during the pandemic. It has been informed by practitioners, supervisors, NGOs and governments across the world, who have shared both challenges and innovative ideas.

This document is an Annex to the Technical Note: Protection of Children during the Coronavirus Pandemic and has been prepared by: Global Social Service Workforce Alliance, UNICEF, International Federation of Social Workers and the Alliance for Child Protection in Humanitarian Action.

Download and review the Technical Note now.


New #Advocacy Guidance from Interagency Working Group on VAC #Advocacy

Chris Cooper - ChildFund
 

New #Advocacy Guidance for COVID-19 Response from the UN Interagency Working Group on Violence Against Children is available here:

 

Interagency Working Group on Violence Against Children Agenda for Action – April 2020

 

 

Christopher Cooper
Advocacy & Policy Advisor

545 Fifth Avenue, Suite 1402, New York, NY 10017
(o) +1.212.697.0238 
 (c) +1.202.251.7166

 

 


#PositiveParenting #MHPSSforCaregivers #PositiveParenting #MHPSSforCaregivers

Lauren Bienkowski
 

Hello All, 

We've frequently received questions related to what supports are available for parents, related to both positive parenting tips and their own mental health.   Thus, we would like to share some recent resources on these topics. 

  • UNICEF Parenting Resources and Tips
  • Tips for parents and caregivers during COVID-19 School Closures: Supporting children’s wellbeing and learning, by Save the Children and the MHPSS Collaborative (available in English, Spanish, and French)
  • The CP AoR MHPSS Coordination Specialist, in collaboration with Save the Children and UNICEF MHPSS Specialists, developed tipsheets on promoting the wellbeing of caregivers and their children along with messages for parents/caregivers.  Wellbeing Tipsheets are available in English, French, Italian, Spanish, and Swahili currently.  The Messages for Parents doc is available in English and Arabic.
  • Parenting for Lifelong Health along with partners, such as UNICEF, WHO, and the Global Partnership to End Violence Against children, has developed 6 parenting tip sheets on 1) One-on-One Time; 2) Keeping it Positive; 3) Structure Up; 4) Managing Challenging Behaviors; 5) Keeping Calm and Managing Stress; and 6) Talking about COVID-19.  The posters / tipsheets are currently available in over 50 languages, with more languages to be added soon.  *Note: Please adapt messages as appropriate (for example, language around “bad behaviors” on tipsheet 4 may not be ideal, so consider using alternative, more positive language).
Please let us know if you have any questions about these resources, 
Lauren 


#COVID19Resources #covid19resources

Lauren Bienkowski
 

Hi All, 

Many of you have seen these by now, but sharing the following resources just in case: 

If you would like to contribute a resource from your country context, please do share with us.  We'd be grateful to learn from your experience. 

Warm regards, 
Lauren 

CP AoR Global Help Desk

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