Date   

Re: quarantine interferes with child development #MHPSSforChildren #MHPSS #childdevelopment #QuarantineFacilities

lucie.allingri@...
 

https://www.futurelearn.com/courses/youth-mental-health-during-covid-19
just to inform people who might be interested with.


Working with Health Sector and other sectors #CPMainstreamingandIntegration

Krissie Hayes
 

Dear all
i would be very interested to hear how other contexts are supporting child protection within the health sector actions. If anyone has experiences or tools for training, tips, guidance, etc., these would also be appreciated.
In situations where access for protection is severely restricted, health actors are still able to access so this conversation would be a useful one for us!
thank you
krissie 


Re: quarantine interferes with child development #MHPSSforChildren #MHPSS #childdevelopment #QuarantineFacilities

Koen Sevenants
 

Hmm. Ok, then. Let’s talk about adolescents and how parents and caregivers can reduce the impact of quarantine on adolescents.  As I mentioned, for adolescents it is bit of more complicated story. What you need to know that is when we talk about social and emotional development, we often refer to something what is called the ‘task of age’. In simple words, the task of age refers to things that are child has to learn at a specific age. I am not talking about school learning or academic learning. Instead, I refer to social and emotional aspects that child needs to learn. A simple example: if you listen to two-years old, you will often hear the word ‘no’. To learn to say ‘no’ is a socio-emotional task of age. If the child does not learn to say no at that age, it will have consequences for the rest for the remains of his/her life (although this can be adjusted). So, adolescents have  3 tasks of age: (1) they will do a mental review of their life (which can lead  to disappointment and as such anger at parents, since parents used to be his/her heroes), (2) finding an answer to the question ‘who am I’ and (3) further emotional separation from parents. In each of these tasks, peers are very important. So, now the question of reducing the impact on development of adolescents becomes: how you can assist adolescents to comply with each of these development tasks-of-age in the absence of peers. If you confirm that this is clear for you and you are with me on this,  I will proceed with the first task-of-age

 

 

From: <Forum@CPCOVID19.groups.io> on behalf of "JWedge via groups.io" <joannawedge@...>
Reply to: "Forum@CPCOVID19.groups.io" <Forum@CPCOVID19.groups.io>
Date: Tuesday, 2 June 2020 at 21:08
To: "Forum@CPCOVID19.groups.io Group Moderators" <Forum@CPCOVID19.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [cpaorcovid19] quarantine interferes with child development #MHPSSforChildren #MHPSS #childdevelopment #QuarantineFacilities

 

I would be interested in hearing Koen's approach for adolescents. I often find that we limit our discussions on MHPSS to younger children. I am all ears.

 

On Tue, 2 Jun 2020 at 12:54, Koen Maurice Sevenants <ksevenants@...> wrote:

Dear Eric, thank you for the interest in this topic. In general, topics concerning child development in general and more specifically social and emotional development are not receiving enough attention. Mostly people involved in MHPSS focus on psychosocial states on this very moment without placing it in the wider picture of comprehensive development of the child.  Yet, it is the impact  that events and difficult periods have on the development of the child that will last way into adulthood.  To answer your question: yes. There are things that parents or caregivers can do. (1) Be aware that social development occurs in the  relation between people and between children. For children going to primary school it is normal and good that they have best friends, change best friends, make little groups, and have small quarrels (obviously not to the point of bullying!). The child is exploring social interactions and relations. As parents there is no need to interfere, nor to be judgmental or take sides. During quarantine you can facilitate contact with friends over the phone, and you can also bring – although not physically- friends into the room. This is how you do that: Let children draw their friends and the games they play. Let them explain why they like their friends. Let them draw or explain what they value in other children, how they can be nice to children and how children can be nice to them. Let them explain how going on a big walk with their friends would be, what they would be talking about, etc. Be creative in finding ways to bring social contact in the hearts of the children 😊. For adolescents, it is slightly more complicated. But if you are interested I can also tell you how to mitigate the impact of quarantine on their social and emotional development.

 

From: <Forum@CPCOVID19.groups.io> on behalf of "Eric Wyss via groups.io" <ericwyss=yahoo.com@groups.io>
Reply to: "Forum@CPCOVID19.groups.io" <Forum@CPCOVID19.groups.io>
Date: Tuesday, 2 June 2020 at 16:32
To: "Forum@CPCOVID19.groups.io" <Forum@CPCOVID19.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [cpaorcovid19] quarantine interferes with child development #MHPSSforChildren #MHPSS #childdevelopment #QuarantineFacilities

 

Thanks Koen. Is it unavoidable that quarantines produce such negative effects or are there ways to avoid those in the first place while they last?



--

Joanna Wedge, M.S.W.

International consultant: child protection & safeguarding / humanitarian capacity-building

Phone/Whatsapp: +1.647.778.4308 (UTC-5)

Skype: joanna.wedge

 


Re: quarantine interferes with child development #MHPSSforChildren #MHPSS #childdevelopment #QuarantineFacilities

JWedge
 

I would be interested in hearing Koen's approach for adolescents. I often find that we limit our discussions on MHPSS to younger children. I am all ears.


On Tue, 2 Jun 2020 at 12:54, Koen Maurice Sevenants <ksevenants@...> wrote:

Dear Eric, thank you for the interest in this topic. In general, topics concerning child development in general and more specifically social and emotional development are not receiving enough attention. Mostly people involved in MHPSS focus on psychosocial states on this very moment without placing it in the wider picture of comprehensive development of the child.  Yet, it is the impact  that events and difficult periods have on the development of the child that will last way into adulthood.  To answer your question: yes. There are things that parents or caregivers can do. (1) Be aware that social development occurs in the  relation between people and between children. For children going to primary school it is normal and good that they have best friends, change best friends, make little groups, and have small quarrels (obviously not to the point of bullying!). The child is exploring social interactions and relations. As parents there is no need to interfere, nor to be judgmental or take sides. During quarantine you can facilitate contact with friends over the phone, and you can also bring – although not physically- friends into the room. This is how you do that: Let children draw their friends and the games they play. Let them explain why they like their friends. Let them draw or explain what they value in other children, how they can be nice to children and how children can be nice to them. Let them explain how going on a big walk with their friends would be, what they would be talking about, etc. Be creative in finding ways to bring social contact in the hearts of the children 😊. For adolescents, it is slightly more complicated. But if you are interested I can also tell you how to mitigate the impact of quarantine on their social and emotional development.

 

From: <Forum@CPCOVID19.groups.io> on behalf of "Eric Wyss via groups.io" <ericwyss=yahoo.com@groups.io>
Reply to: "Forum@CPCOVID19.groups.io" <Forum@CPCOVID19.groups.io>
Date: Tuesday, 2 June 2020 at 16:32
To: "Forum@CPCOVID19.groups.io" <Forum@CPCOVID19.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [cpaorcovid19] quarantine interferes with child development #MHPSSforChildren #MHPSS #childdevelopment #QuarantineFacilities

 

Thanks Koen. Is it unavoidable that quarantines produce such negative effects or are there ways to avoid those in the first place while they last?



--
Joanna Wedge, M.S.W.
International consultant: child protection & safeguarding / humanitarian capacity-building
Phone/Whatsapp: +1.647.778.4308 (UTC-5)
Skype: joanna.wedge


Re: quarantine interferes with child development #MHPSSforChildren #MHPSS #childdevelopment #QuarantineFacilities

Koen Sevenants
 

Dear Eric, thank you for the interest in this topic. In general, topics concerning child development in general and more specifically social and emotional development are not receiving enough attention. Mostly people involved in MHPSS focus on psychosocial states on this very moment without placing it in the wider picture of comprehensive development of the child.  Yet, it is the impact  that events and difficult periods have on the development of the child that will last way into adulthood.  To answer your question: yes. There are things that parents or caregivers can do. (1) Be aware that social development occurs in the  relation between people and between children. For children going to primary school it is normal and good that they have best friends, change best friends, make little groups, and have small quarrels (obviously not to the point of bullying!). The child is exploring social interactions and relations. As parents there is no need to interfere, nor to be judgmental or take sides. During quarantine you can facilitate contact with friends over the phone, and you can also bring – although not physically- friends into the room. This is how you do that: Let children draw their friends and the games they play. Let them explain why they like their friends. Let them draw or explain what they value in other children, how they can be nice to children and how children can be nice to them. Let them explain how going on a big walk with their friends would be, what they would be talking about, etc. Be creative in finding ways to bring social contact in the hearts of the children 😊. For adolescents, it is slightly more complicated. But if you are interested I can also tell you how to mitigate the impact of quarantine on their social and emotional development.

 

From: <Forum@CPCOVID19.groups.io> on behalf of "Eric Wyss via groups.io" <ericwyss@...>
Reply to: "Forum@CPCOVID19.groups.io" <Forum@CPCOVID19.groups.io>
Date: Tuesday, 2 June 2020 at 16:32
To: "Forum@CPCOVID19.groups.io" <Forum@CPCOVID19.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [cpaorcovid19] quarantine interferes with child development #MHPSSforChildren #MHPSS #childdevelopment #QuarantineFacilities

 

Thanks Koen. Is it unavoidable that quarantines produce such negative effects or are there ways to avoid those in the first place while they last?


Re: quarantine interferes with child development #MHPSSforChildren #MHPSS #childdevelopment #QuarantineFacilities

Eric Wyss
 

Thanks Koen. Is it unavoidable that quarantines produce such negative effects or are there ways to avoid those in the first place while they last?


Re: Webinar In ARABIC about burn out of front line Workers during COVID 19 #covid19resources

Eric Wyss
 

Thanks Lucie for sharing!


Webinar In ARABIC about burn out of front line Workers during COVID 19 #covid19resources

lucie.allingri@...
 

.Hi, AMANE a Moroccan NGO working in child protection fiels, is creating a serie of Webinar in ARABIC to share ressources to support front line workers working with children during COVID 19. Our first webinar will be about "How to avoid burn out during COVID 19 ?". Thursday 04 of June at 8 PM ( 9PM Paris time). It will be attended by M. Abdelouadoud Kharbouch, Psychologist and child protection expert.
To participate, please go to this link and do not hesitate to share. : https://us02web.zoom.us/j/88688182719


quarantine interferes with child development #MHPSSforChildren #MHPSS #childdevelopment #QuarantineFacilities

Koen Sevenants
 

It is expected that a prolonged lockdown period has a substantial impact on child development, especially in middle childhood and adolescence. Socal development, in which peers play a fundamental role, is somehow disrupted. The consequences will only be visible in the middle and long term. For educators and caregivers, it is hard to balance physical protection with the hard impact of child development consequences. Consider facilitating peer contacts as soon as it is reasonably safe among other things.


Re: #ChildHelplines #covid19response #VAC #Webinar #ChildHelplines #covid19response #vac #Webinar

PSG Consult
 

Very helpful, many thanks.

Best regards from James Town, Accra.

---------

Paul Semeh

Founding Consultant
PSG Consult Ltd
P.O. Box JT 235, James Town, Accra, Ghana
Loc. H/No.OB 16/41, Sowutuom - Accra West 
Mob: +233243438580

Follow us: Facebook

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On Fri, May 29, 2020 at 1:30 PM <chantal.neuweiler@...> wrote:
Hi all,
The technical note on child helplines is out! 
As a response to the COVID-19 crisis, child protection actors and service providers are exploring how they can continue to provide support to children, families and communities remotely through the use of technology. This includes child helplines, which, over the last decade, have become increasingly important in responding to concerns raised by children and young people on a range of issues affecting their lives. 
The note which was developed jointly by Child Helplines international, the CP AoR, the Alliance for Child Protection in Humanitarian Action and UNICEF is aimed at practitioners and has two main objectives:
  1. To provide practical advice to child protection actors and service providers – including government departments, (I)NGOs, civil society organisations (CSO), community-based organisations (CBO), UN agencies and child protection coordination groups – on how to support children and families through a child helpline service, including collaboration with existing, national child helplines to avoid duplication.
  2. To explore how existing child helplines can contribute to, and participate in, efforts to support children and families during the COVID-19 pandemic through child protection mechanisms and systems. This includes expanding their services.


Re: #ChildHelplines #covid19response #VAC #Webinar #ChildHelplines #covid19response #vac #Webinar

Chantal Neuweiler
 

Hi all,
The technical note on child helplines is out! 
As a response to the COVID-19 crisis, child protection actors and service providers are exploring how they can continue to provide support to children, families and communities remotely through the use of technology. This includes child helplines, which, over the last decade, have become increasingly important in responding to concerns raised by children and young people on a range of issues affecting their lives. 
The note which was developed jointly by Child Helplines international, the CP AoR, the Alliance for Child Protection in Humanitarian Action and UNICEF is aimed at practitioners and has two main objectives:
  1. To provide practical advice to child protection actors and service providers – including government departments, (I)NGOs, civil society organisations (CSO), community-based organisations (CBO), UN agencies and child protection coordination groups – on how to support children and families through a child helpline service, including collaboration with existing, national child helplines to avoid duplication.
  2. To explore how existing child helplines can contribute to, and participate in, efforts to support children and families during the COVID-19 pandemic through child protection mechanisms and systems. This includes expanding their services.


Webinar on 2nd June 2020: Discussion with GBV and CP AoRs on Service Adaptation and Collaboration with Camp Management during COVID-19 Response #CPMainstreamingandIntegration #Webinar #cccm

Lauren Bienkowski
 

 

Dear all,

The Global CCCM Cluster, would like to invite you to join the seventh webinar of the ‘CCCM in COVID-19’ webinar series:

‘Discussion with GBV and CP AoRs on Service Adaptation and Collaboration with Camp Management during COVID-19 Response’
2nd of June 2020, 2pm (CET)

This webinar will hold discussions and sharing of first-hand experiences of country programmes between CCCM, Gender-Based Violence (GBV) and Child Protection (CP) practitioners on the current response to COVID-19, the heightened risks faced by women and children during this pandemic and the coordination between camp management and protection actors. The speakers for this webinar have been involved in preparedness and response to COVID-19 in camp or camp-like settings and this webinar will be capitalising on their experiences in the field.

Speakers
Priscilla Scalco 
Programme Coordinator (CCCM)
IOM South Sudan
 
Maisori Chacha
GBV Sub-Cluster Coordinator
Bangladesh
 
Joyce Mutiso
Child Protection Sub-Cluster Coordinator
Northeast Nigeria

Event time
Tuesday, 2nd June 2020

  • Geneva: 14:00 – 15:30
  • New York: 08:00 – 09:30
  • London: 13:00 – 14:30
  • Nairobi: 15:00 – 16:30
  • Bangkok: 19:00 – 20:30
  • Manila: 20:00 – 21:30


For those interested, please RSVP through the link below by Monday, 1st June 2020: REGISTER HERE. 

To ensure a smooth discussion during this webinar and to ensure the maximum number of questions are addressed, please submit any question you would like to ask during the webinar using the RSVP link above.

How to Connect
The webinar will be hosted on
WEBEX. After registering, participants will receive an email on information on joining the webinar on Monday,1st June 2020. 
 
Feel free to circulate this invite to any of your field colleagues that could be interested.
If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to reach out to us   at globalsupport@...
 
We look forward to seeing you at the webinar! 

Kind Regards,
The Global CCCM Cluster

 

 

 

 


#ChildHelplines #covid19response #VAC #Webinar #ChildHelplines #covid19response #vac #Webinar

Chantal Neuweiler
 
Edited

**CHANGE OF DATE**
Good morning everyone!
On Thursday 4th June at 2pm CEST, Child Helplines International (CHI), the Alliance for CP in humanitarian action, the CP AoR and UNICEF are co-hosting a webinar with a Q&A session to present the new technical note on child helplines in the context of the COVID19 response. The note will be issued in the coming days and aims at:
  1. Providing practical guidance to child protection actors and service providers, including government departments, (I)NGOs, CSOs and UN agencies and child protection coordination groups on how they might provide support to children and families through a helpline service; or by collaboration with an existing national child helpline;
  2. Exploring how existing child helplines  can contribute to, and participate in, efforts to support children and families during the COVID-19 pandemic, through child protection mechanisms and systems.  This includes expanding their services, and with a view to avoiding duplication. 
You can register and find more information here. We look forward to your participation, questions and sharing of experiences!
best regards,
Chantal


Re: #CoordinationwithGBV #CoordinationwithGBV

chickling@...
 

Dear Désirée ETOBE,

 

Thank you so much for your post and I am sorry to respond in English! Especially I want to thank you for sharing the inspiring information about strong collaborative CP and GBV activities.  It is encouraging to hear that case workers are trained to respond to both CP and GBV cases, and that Health and PSS are included too. Do you encourage/offer joint training opportunities for case workers to continue building these skills? I would also be interested to know if you have developed a Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) or other type of agreement governing the activities and collaborative process?

 

COVID-19 is highlighting the need for maximizing both CP and GBV actors’ capacity to respond to both sets of cases, and we are scrambling to increase the efforts in building these skills. I would however suggest that you already have a head-start in that the actors already have some experience in working closely together.

 

I am attaching a link to the Child and Adolescent Survivor Initiative (CASI) COVID-19 Guidance Note. CASI is also developing a specific TIP sheet for the coordination aspects.   

Later in the year CASI is planning to offer an online training/workshop on coordination of case management for CP and GBV coordinators, which you might be interested in attending to share your experiences and learn from others.

 

Meanwhile, CASI is working on a participatory approach for CP and GBV actors to better understand and address the barriers that adolescent survivors of sexual violence face when seeking services. From our experience, this is an important area for CP and GBV actors, including Health and PSS to work together on with young people.  

 

I would be very grateful if we could stay in contact, and continue sharing experiences.

 

Warmest regards,

 

Carina

 


Re: #CoordinationwithGBV #CoordinationwithGBV

gertrude desiree etobe
 


Bonjour chère Carina,
Désolée de répondre en français, mais c'est la langue dans laquelle je m'exprime le mieux.

Je suis Désirée ETOBE, je travaille pour la protection à base communautaire au HCR, sous bureau de Kousseri. Dans notre contexte, nous avons deux sous groupes distincts CP, et SGBV. Mais dans ces sous groupe nous avons des activités communes comme le panel DIS, la conférence des cas, le référencement et le suivi des cas, les descentes commune de terrain et ces deux groupes sont chapeautés par la protection ou des échanges d'informations, documents, référencement se font.
Les deux groupes ne peuvent être fusionnés car mis à part les activités communes chacun à ses activités spécifiques, et CP est co leade par UNICEF, SGBV est co leade en l'absence de UNFPA par le HCR.

Des partenaires ont mis sur pied des lignes vertes, les case worker sont formé (es) pour écouter en même temps des cas de CP et des cas de SGBV, il en est de même dans la réponse sur le terrain en particulier pour la santé, le soutien psychosocial, les appuis. 

Merci
ED



Hello dear Carina,

I'm sorry to answer in French, but that's the language in which I express myself best.



I am Désirée ETOBE, I work for community-based protection at the UNHCR, Kousseri field unit.  In our context, we have two distinct sub-groups, CP and SGBV.  But in these sub-groups we have common activities such as the DIS panel, case conferencing, referral and follow-up of cases, common field visits and these two groups are headed by the protection sub group, were they exchanges information, documents, and referrals are made.

The two groups cannot be merged because, apart from the common activities, each one has its own specific activities, and CP is colead by UNICEF, SGBV is colead in the absence of UNFPA by UNHCR. 

 Partners have set up green lines, the case workers are trained to listen to CP and SGBV cases at the same time, and the same applies to the response in the field, particularly for health, psychosocial support and support.  It must be said that this is not fully harmonized, the COVID crisis took us by surprise.  So we are trying to adapt.

If we can have any support for the two sub group to work together, I'll be happy
 

Thank you

ED




Le lun. 11 mai 2020 à 05:34, <chickling@...> a écrit :
Hello Colleagues!

I am looking for some examples of where child protection (CP coordination group, child protection case management, CP agencies etc.) are working/coordinating with GBV. The context is that CASI is seeking to build our understanding of how the coordination groups are overcoming the COVID-19 restrictions.
Warm regards Carina Hickling, CASI Coordinator CP AoR


Re: #homevisits #decisiontree #homevisits #decisiontree

tina yap
 

Hi Lauren,
Thank you for sharing the resources, that's quite a bulk topic. I am actually very excited and I believe the guidelines will be a great help. 


New Alliance Annex to the Child Protection COVID-19 Technical Note & Webinar: Working with Communities to Keep Children Safe #Webinar #technicalnote #workingwithcommunities

Lauren Bienkowski
 

Hi All, 

The Alliance is happy to share a new Annex to the Technical Note: Protection of Children during the COVID-19 Pandemic. This Annex focuses on Working with Communities to Keep Children Safe during the COVID-19 PandemicRead more about the new annex and download here.   A webinar on the same topic has been scheduled for tomorrow, 20th May at 2:00 PM - 3:30 PM CET.  Register here.  

Description of the Annex below:

Infectious diseases like COVID-19 can disrupt the protective environments in which children grow and develop. Disruptions to families, friendships, daily routines and the wider community can have negative consequences for children’s well-being, development and protection. COVID-19 also has a direct impact on the ability of child protection actors to engage with communities, as well as on the ability of communities to self-protect and support each other. Learning from past infectious disease outbreaks has demonstrated that community members act to protect children from the onset of the crisis, and are best placed to identify both child protection and COVID-19 related risks and respond effectively and appropriately.  

This guidance aims at supporting child protection actors working with communities to keep children safe to adapt their programming to the contagious environment of COVID-19. It builds upon Standard 17 in the Minimum Standards for Child Protection in Humanitarian Action and includes key actions and hyperlinks to additional resources, links and tips aimed at:  

  1. Understanding how communities organize themselves to protect children in times of COVID-19
  2. Working with communities to implement safe and effective ways to protect children in times of COVID-19
  3. The health, safety and wellbeing of community members.  

We hope you can participate in the webinar tomorrow; otherwise, a recording of the webinar will be uploaded here.  

Warmest regards, 
Sara & Lauren


Re: #streetchildren #streetchildren

Learning and Development Focal Point
 

Hi Paul, 

It would certainly be an interesting exchange. I am however not the organizer of the webinar. You would need to get in touch with them directly: AfriChild: The Center for the Study of the African Child and the Care and Protection of Children (CPC) Learning Network

Let me knkow if you experience any difficulties

Thank you

Elena


Re: #homevisits #decisiontree #homevisits #decisiontree

Lauren Bienkowski
 

Hello Tina, 

Great to hear from you.  I invite you to review adapted case management guideline examples from Lebanon, Iraq, Somalia, Myanmar, and Albania in this folder, where many countries have planned on delivering services either in-person or by phone according to vulnerability criteria and risk levels determined in country (and, of course, in line with safety protocols as agreed upon with health colleagues and national authorities).   

As this is quite a large and nuanced topic, I invite colleagues from the global Case Management Task Force and countries that have adapted their case management services and SOPs to share their experiences as well.  Additionally, GBV colleagues have developed helpful guidance notes as well, including the recent "Not just hotlines and mobile phones: GBV Service provision during COVID-19" note, which highlights a few ideas related to the issue of reaching survivors who cannot easily access phone-based GBV support.

Additionally, further guidance on Adapted Child Protection Case Management is coming out from the Alliance for CPHA this week, so we hope to share that soon.   

Warmly, 
Lauren


Re: #Localisation #Localisation

 

To ensure effective and efficient response during the pandemic, local NGO through coordinated approach with community base volunteers, Child protection committee, clubs and Associations serve as the first responder to provide Child protection services with full support of community leaders. Therefore equipping the local NGO with international best practice should be the priority  area of both UN and international organizations. GSF adopted this process where we use our trained CPC for identification and referral to basic services and recruited community base case workers and PSS facilitators to provide integrated case management support and PSS with a remote supervision from the child protection officer using phone call where there are full lockdown and community visit ones in a week.

Yusuf, Grow Strong Foundation 

Nigeria

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